A record number of people turned up for today's bird walk on a gorgeous sunny morning. We were rewarded with a real rarity - a Ring-necked Parakeet! This species has a stronghold in the London area but has been threatening to move west and there have been increasing numbers of records in our area in the last few years. Also we heard a Blackcap in full song and another surprise was a Buzzard drifting overhead.

Full list of birds seen and/or heard as follows:

Ring-necked Parakeet
Blackcap
Blue Tit
Great Tit
Coal Tit
Long-tailed Tit
Goldcrest
Greenfinch
Chaffinch
Dunnock
Blackbird
Woodpigeon
Collared Dove
Buzzard
Wren
Starling
Carrion Crow
Robin
Magpie

Thanks to all the lovely people who came along! Next walk will be on 19th April - full details to follow.

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Comment by Des Bowring on March 18, 2009 at 22:41
That might explain why it kept climbing up a little ladder and rang a bell!
Comment by admin on March 18, 2009 at 0:21
Metford Road Allotment gates (Westbury Park/Redland) has a 'lost' poster on it saying that a parakeet had gone missing from a home. Could this be the same one?
Comment by Simon Randolph on March 16, 2009 at 10:11
The ring-necked parakeet was a real surprise! Its screeching call alerted us to its hidden presence in an evergreen holm oak by the north western corner entrance. At first we thought it might have been someone in a house nearby who was playing games with us birdwatchers. But the bird soon flew out and back into the main part of the park, giving us a brief but sufficient view to enable us to identify it. As Des suggests, this individual probably originates from the several thousand breeding birds that are now established in the London/Surrey area and if you go on to the website:wwwbirdguides.com/species/species/ there are recent records for the last two months that range across the country from Dorset, Oxfordshire and Northants to Lancashire. It seems that sooner rather than later there will be new breeding colonies developing in several parts of the country. It will be interesting to see if our bird ( or possibly a pair??) stays in the park or moves on.

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